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Watch: The Stunning Science of Snowflakes

See why falling flakes are a chemical masterpiece


You've probably heard the old adage that no two snowflakes are alike. Turns out, that's only partly true. In fact, there's a rather precise science behind every snowflake's structure making some utterly unique and others, well, not so much.

The American Chemical Society has delved into the chemistry of snowflakes' formation, creating an animated video that explains nature's process, beginning with a dust particle in a cloud and ending with the final fluffy flake.

It's not the first video about cold-weather chemistry to capture our attention this winter. We recently featured this video of a man throwing boiling water into freezing air. The water instantly turned to vapor, a sight so compelling the video went viral, catching the news media's attention.

"I'm on the top of the cover page right next to the news about a conflict between Putin and the Ukrainian president," the Russian man who threw the water wrote on his Facebook page. "Are there any more important things in this world than a pot of boiling water? :)"

RELATED ON SKYE: 15 Captivating Photos of Snowflakes

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Susan

The article is about SNOWFLAKES not political flakes!

January 06 2013 at 8:58 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Malegxy

"beginning with a dust particle in a cloud" ???? Yuck...eating snow just took on a whole new meaning. =\

January 06 2013 at 8:11 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
msbrlngtn3

What college did you go to because you cant spell....hahaha

January 05 2013 at 9:26 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
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